Threads by Most Recent Post  Hot Threads  Post Index  Thread Index  Eye Scene Front Page

Vision

Post to This Thread


Glass Lenses 05 Jul 2018, 20:09

newglasses

You do realize that this is a glasses fetish website, and that your post has already sexually aroused Soundmapt and georg1968, and others that have not yet responded.

Perhaps you are one with this fetish, and are out here trolling for responses.


newglasses 05 Jul 2018, 17:08

Hi Soundmapt and georg1968,

thanks for your answers.

i forgot to mention this but i am currently studying abroad in paris and i will be heading back to the states next week. i'm afraid to show my family and friends back home my glasses especially because they are so thick and will think my vision is so bad. i might not wear them in the states for a while until i feel comfortable telling them about my glasses but i am just so concerned for my safety so i might have to try not wearing the glasses right now so it won't be such a shock when i go back but my main concern is that without my glasses, i literally feel nauseous... is that bad?? and yea, i hate to admit it but i'm probably full time already because the other day, i put them on in the morning right out of bed and didn't take them off till i went to bed. whenever i take off my glasses, i squint so hard but still can't see anything.


Soundmanpt 05 Jul 2018, 16:55

newglasses

You posted in here and in the "New Glasses" thread. I assume that you weren't sure was the best one to be in.

Anyway I will only answer you in here. What George 1968 has said and Maxim have told you I completely agree with. Getting a first prescription of -3.25 is on the high side for sure. most usually get their first glasses prescribed when the are only at -.75 or maybe -1.00. As you can see by the difference you're considerably past those numbers. Also most people will tell you that they normally start keeping their glasses on when their prescription reaches around -1.50 or slightly more. Wearing your glasses full time isn't in anyway going to make your eyesight worse. But i'm sure that it has to feel that way for you now when you wear your glasses for a short while and then take them off. Just understand the way you see when you take off your glasses is what your actual eyesight really is, not what you have been before you got your glasses. Before you simply using something called"accommodation" which was telling your brain what different things you were looking at was. Like George 1968 told you, their isn't any glasses police so no one is going to force you to wear your glasses. It's totally up to you when you choose to wear them. But it would seem much more logical that if you are able to see perfect wearing your glasses and not so well without them why wouldn't you wear them?


George1968 05 Jul 2018, 14:36

Hi newglasses,

The short answer to your question is, no. At -3.25, almost everyone is wearing their glasses full-time.

There are no glasses police, and you can wear your glasses as much or as little as you want. But, the reason that you see so much blur is that your eyes are not straining the way that they wear. They have relaxed, and you now have your actual vision. In other words, that blur is not going away.

So, if the blur bothers you, leave your glasses on. If not, at least wear them when you drive.

Good luck and keep us posted.


newglasses 05 Jul 2018, 13:16

So I recently just got glasses around a week ago and I have found it inevitable to have to use them for certain things like watching the TV, seeing the board at school and in general, seeing anything far away. So I slip them on for those activities and take them off afterwards. But around three days ago I have been finding myself leaving them on after those activities. Is that bad??? Does that mean I’m becoming full time?? I just like seeing things clearly but I don’t want my eyes to deteriorate especially because my optician said my first prescription is pretty high. But now when I take off my glasses, the world is a literal blur and I feel like I’m going to bump into people and I get a headache so I just put them back on. Can I break out of this full time habit without getting headaches or feeling nauseous without my glasses?! This didn’t happen a week ago. My prescription is -3.25 in both eyes.


Soundmanpt 03 Jul 2018, 13:38

Curious

Even though your prescription isn't very strong the more you wear your glasses them more your eyes are going to adjust to them and become more comfortable wearing them then not wearing them. Because your nearsighted you really mainly need your glasses for seeing at a distance. But even with only being -1.00 anything more than a few feet in front of you is going to become more and more blurry from that point further away. Your eyes are probably more comfortable with your glasses on because it is just about at the distance where you start to need your glasses. I would assume that even though you're pretty much wearing your glasses full time now you should still be able to read small type in a book or see you phone without your glasses pretty well. But 18" - 24" is still considered as a distance. You sound like you're actually very comfortable wearing your glasses full time so I wouldn't worry about if wearing glasses doesn't bother you.


Curious 03 Jul 2018, 12:26

I have had -1.00 glasses for about 6 months now. I didn't really think I needed them but they do make things in the distance, especially signs clearer particularly at night. The more I wear them the more I am coming to need them and now am pretty much full time. Now I am noticing that if I don't wear them, my computer screen at about 18-24" isn't as clear. Is it normal that if I have adjusted to -1.00's there would be a blur at this short distance?


Cactus Jack 27 Jun 2018, 04:41

Kat78,

The most important thing after your actual prescription. is your Pupillary Distance (PD). Typically, the PD is not on the slip the examiner provides, but is measured by the entity selling the glasses. The best Visual Acuity occurs when your Central Axes of Vision pass through the Optical Center of the lens. You are exactly right about how very important that is, with your prescription.

For people with mild prescriptions it is really easy to measure by looking in a mirror. Unfortunately that won't work for you. If you have a ruler calibrated in mm, a friend or partner may be able to measure that for you in just a minute or so. They would do it like they used to do it years ago, before most optical shops got the fancy PD measuring gadgets.

If you need refreshing on how to measure the PD by "hand", I'll be happy to help.

When you get the PD, I would suggest considering ordering q "trial" pair of single vision glasses from Zenni Optical. Using their least expensive frame (US$6.95) they would be around US$30 to 35 because of the high prescription. However, there would likely be some UK duty. Incidentally, Zenni offer some tips and a printable rule to help you measure your PD. Some of our UK members may have some suggestion about ordering a "trial" pair from a UK online retailer.

Remember, this pair of glasses has one function, to learn how to order glasses online and evaluate their optical quality. They will have low index lenses, which will be very thick. They are only for wear in private. If you like the optics, you can consider ordering a nicer frame and higher index lenses.

Here is the Simple Eye Test for a person with a strong prescription.

Simple Eye Test - with Prescription Glasses

Frequently, if you have been wearing a prescription for some time, it is desirable to get an idea of changes to expect, when you get a new eye exam. This test will ONLY estimate Sphere changes, NOT Astigmatism changes. Astigmatism, corrected by Cylinder and Axis in a prescription, usually changes very slowly.

This Simple Eye Test is designed to be done in the privacy of your home. You will need only 3 items to do the test:

A pair of +1.50 or +1.75 Over-the-Counter (OTC) reading glasses. Their purpose is to artificially create a known amount of Myopia or additional Myopia and get the test measurements into a comfortable range. Please DO NOT use prescription READING glasses for this test, if they have any Cylinder Correction. It could invalidate the results. OTC Reading Glasses DO NOT have any Cylinder Correction.

A 6 ft or 2 meter tape measure calibrated in inches or cm depending on your preferences.

A Book or Newspaper with small print to use as a Target for the test.

Test Procedure

Put on the OTC reading glasses OVER your regular glasses with a known prescription. If you wear bifocals, trifocals, or progressives, tis test is done looking through the DISTANCE part of your glasses. In good, but not brilliant light, test each eye individually.

Hold the target about 12 inches or 30 cm from your face and slowly move it away from your face until the letters in the small text just begin to get fuzzy around the edges. Note the distance.

Do step 1, above 3 times and average the distance from your eye, where the text just began to get fuzzy around the edges.

Do steps 1 and 2 again for the other eye.

Report the average distances for each eye individually, to me for evaluation and estimated changes in your current prescription.

If you are very Myopic or Hyperopic, try to look thru the Optical center of your regular glasses lens for the best accuracy.

With the above information you will know better what to expect, but before you book an exam, I strongly suggest that you review a piece I wrote “How to Study for an Eye Exam”. It is posted on the Vision and Spex website. If you can’t find it, I will post it agin here. Included in the piece is how to “fine tune” the Cylinder Axis during the exam for the best accuracy.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Cactus Jack


Kat78 27 Jun 2018, 02:48

Cactus Jack. I forgot to say I am in the UK and work in an accounting office. I've never ordered any glasses online before. How would I know the lenses would be positioned properly for my eyes as I know it's important with my high prescription?


Kat78 27 Jun 2018, 02:48

Cactus Jack. I forgot to say I am in the UK and work in an accounting office. I've never ordered any glasses online before. How would I know the lenses would be positioned properly for my eyes as I know it's important with my high prescription?


Kat78 27 Jun 2018, 02:48

Cactus Jack. I forgot to say I am in the UK and work in an accounting office. I've never ordered any glasses online before. How would I know the lenses would be positioned properly for my eyes as I know it's important with my high prescription?


Kat78 27 Jun 2018, 02:03

Thanks Brian. Those lenses sound interesting and I found that essilor do some which is the brand of lenses I normally get. I'll ask my optician about whether those would be any help. I think I'll probably end up needing new lenses since I suspect I need an increase for distance in my left eye at least so will see if that affects my close vision.

Cactus Jack, I can try a test if you tell me what to do? My partner has some +1.5 reading glasses. I tried looking through over my own glasses and text was a lot easier to see.


Cactus Jack 26 Jun 2018, 22:12

Weirdeyes,

Because that is the way prisms work. They bend light rays TOWARD the Base (thick part) of the Prism and AWAY from the Apex (tip or thin part).

When your eyes drift outward or diverge, your Central Axes of Vision (CAVs) point outward, away from your nose. The Base In (BI) prisms in your glasses, bend the CAVs of your eyes inward toward the Base of the Prism and your nose. That reduces both the convergence effort you need to expend to fuse distant images, where the CAVs need to be parallel, and the additional convergence effort you need to expend to fuse images of close objects.

I wear BO prism and when I lift my glasses up and down, the image appears to jump inward when I look thru the lenses. What you describe makes sense for BI lenses they should appear to jump outward.

C.


Weirdeyes 26 Jun 2018, 21:34

Why do my base-in prism glasses appear to displace the image outwards when I look through the lens? I expected them to do the opposite since my eyes drift outwards.


Brian 24 Jun 2018, 11:25

Kat78, I'm also 39 going on 40...a few months ago my eye doc put me in a anti fatigue---relax lense..they classify it as a single vision lense but it has a +0.60 boost at the bottom...it will sharpen up your up close vision...i had no issues at all adapting to it and my eye doc said it will make the adjustment to a full progressive in the future a bit easier..the relax lense is also cheaper than progressives as well and has the blue filter for electronics included as well....might be worth checking into...


Brian 24 Jun 2018, 11:25

Kat78, I'm also 39 going on 40...a few months ago my eye doc put me in a anti fatigue---relax lense..they classify it as a single vision lense but it has a +0.60 boost at the bottom...it will sharpen up your up close vision...i had no issues at all adapting to it and my eye doc said it will make the adjustment to a full progressive in the future a bit easier..the relax lense is also cheaper than progressives as well and has the blue filter for electronics included as well....might be worth checking into...


Cactus Jack 24 Jun 2018, 01:48

Kat78,

What you are experiencing is probably related to Presbyopia. It is fairly common and nothing to get very excited about.

Presbyopia, which the gradual thickening of the protein that makes up the Crystalline Lens, actually starts in childhood, gut typically does not become a problem until the late 30s for people with Hyperopia and into the 40s for people with Myopia, as you have. Your genes also play a role in when Presbyopia will become a nuisance.

Your Ciliary Muscles and Crystalline Lenses are the physical parts of your Auto-Focus System. Normally, the Ciliary Muscles and Crystalline Lenses are relaxed for distance vision, When your Myopia is corrected for distance by glasses or contact lenses and you need to focus for seeing things that are closer than 20 feet or 6 meters, your Ciliary Muscles will squeeze your Crystalline Lenses and increase their PLUS power. Your Crystalline Lenses are still flexible enough for your Ciliary Muscles to increase their PLUS power, but they no longer relax as quickly as they did when you were young. When you have been focusing close for a while and then look at a distant object, it will appear blurry, because your Crystalline Lenses have too much PLUS for distant focusing, but after a while, they will relax back to minimal PLUS for distance.

Once you have been corrected to a refractive error of 0.00 for distance, the amount of additional PLUS required to focus close is determined by a formula, developed by Sir Isaac Newton around 1that dates back to around 1700.

Lens Power in Diopters = 1 meter, 100 cm, 1000 mm, or 39.37 inches (40 is close enough) / Focal Distance.

For example, if you like to read at 40 cm or 16 inches, just divide 40 cm into 100 cm or 16 inches into 40 inches and the answer will be very close to +2.50. To focus at that distance, you need +2.50 from somewhere. It can come from your Crystalline Lenses, a Bifocal Add, or a Reduced Distance prescription. It does not have to all come from the same place. Some can come from your Crystalline Lenses and the rest from external correction, but the total HAS to be +2.50.

You were concerned about the cost of glasses. I would like to suggest that you consider ordering some glasses on line. It is not very hard and we can help you.

Zenni Optical is a very good Online Retailer. I suggest checking out their website. I think you will be pleasantly surprised by their prices.

May I as a few questions?

1. Where do your live? (country)

2. What is your occupation?

3. Would you be interesting doing a simple refraction at home to estimate your prescri[tion changes?

4. If so, could you get a pair of inexpensive, non-prescription, Over-the Counter (OTC) reading glasses with a power of +1.50 or +1.75

C.


Kat78 24 Jun 2018, 00:39

I've always had a habit of holding reading material and now my phone closer to my eyes than I guess is usual, even though I wear glasses at a prescription of-12.75 and -10.25. I've suddenly noticed that text is getting blurry but ok if I take it away a bit. It's also clearer again if I close my right eye which I've got in the habit of doing so I can still hold things at my preferred distance. When I look up again though everything is really blurry in the distance, especially through the left eye I was just reading with. The haziness clears a bit but the left eye doesn't get any clearer when I cover one eye then the other to check them. My last vision test was only 18 months ago and my glasses were expensive as they make me get the thinnest sort of lenses. I usually go about 3 years between tests.

Any ideas what's going on? I'm only just turn 40 so would hope it's nothing to do with presbyopia yet. I also have astigmatism of -2.5 and -1.5 which I'm always told is quite high but it hasn't varied much. It means I can't see clearly at any distance without my glasses though and have worn full time since I was 4 when I had to wear a patch over one eye for a while too for some reason.

I know I should get myself back to see my optician but am worried about what it means and the cost of new glasses.


Weirdeyes 21 Jun 2018, 23:38

I found out something interesting at my mom’s eye appointment. She needs base-in prism as well. She got prescribed 0.50 in each eye for distance and 1.00 for up close. She prefers contacts, so she’ll probably go without the prism for distance most of the time.


 19 Jun 2018, 23:27

Do you mean Shoeshiner?


 19 Jun 2018, 12:13

This site will NEVER be what it once was as long as Boozeheimer runs it.


Soundmanpt 19 Jun 2018, 11:47

Mr Cockeyed

I have constantly said that I would would love to see that happen. It would vindicate what I have been saying all along. I never hesitated in signing up over in "Vision and Spex" and i would not hesitate in signing up in "Eyescene " as well. It also might finally get rid of the trolls in here and make this the site it once was.


Mr Cockeyed 19 Jun 2018, 10:01

Soundmanpt, I have not posted for a long time, but all this bullshit of who's real and who's a fake could possibly stop with password protetion


Soundmanpt 18 Jun 2018, 16:45

Weirdeyes

The last two posts were not from me.


Soundmanpt 18 Jun 2018, 15:35

Weiedeyes

Okay, I was just wondering. Then maybe she can as well?


Weirdeyes 18 Jun 2018, 14:57

Soundmanpt

Yeah. Same cyl. -0.75 in the right eye and -1.25 or -1.50 in the left. I obviously see better with glasses, but my right eye can still easily pass the driving test.


Soundmanpt 18 Jun 2018, 14:24

Weirdeyes

Is that including the same CYL as Jen's friend? At +.75 I would agree that she should be able to pass the test. Actually she should simply ask her optometrist if she needs vision correction for driving? But without a doubt even if she isn't required to it would still be advisable for her to wear glasses when driving because she is for sure going t see better with glasses than without. If she doesn't drive then bifocals are completely optional.


Weirdeyes 18 Jun 2018, 11:12

Soundmanpt

Not true. My right eye is that prescription and my right eye can easily pass the driver’s test which requires 20/40 vision. I only failed it because my left eye is bad.


Curt 18 Jun 2018, 09:49

I think it would be worth it. That is not an insignificant prescription.


Jen 18 Jun 2018, 09:20

BTW,my friend is about 45 years old.


Jen 18 Jun 2018, 09:18

Thanks for the reply. I thought you had to subtract the cylinder out since it is minus?


Soundmanpt 18 Jun 2018, 07:49

Jem

Your friend's eyesight isn't all that bad but if she drives a car I seriously doubt that her uncorrected eyesight is good enough to pass the drivers vision test. Remember you have to add in her CYL along with her SPH so when you do that her distance vision is more like +1.00 in both eyes. I'm sure if she were to get the prescribed bifocals she would quickly notice the difference. Aside from driving it would then be up to her as when she chooses to wear her glasses.


Willy 18 Jun 2018, 06:10

Hi Jen -- it would be helpful to know your friend's age in order to make the best recommendation. The prescription listed is one that would probably sharpen things up a little bit at distance, but hardly one that would be considered "necessary" at this point. If your friend is under 45, then the likelihood is that there will be an increase in the distance prescription in future years which, along with the increase in the add, would mean full-time wear will eventually be required. Adapting to bifocals or progressives now at a lower prescription will be easier than later. If he or she is older than 45-50, roughly speaking, then there is the chance that the distance prescription may never increase to the point where it is truly necessary.


Jen 17 Jun 2018, 18:40

Hi all,

I haven't visited in a while but hope you all are well!

I have a question about a prescription for a friend of mine. She recently was prescribed bifocals glasses for fulltime and isn't sure she really need glasses for all the time. She doesn't want to spend a huge amount of money for glasses she may not wear very often. She has been wearing cheap drug store readers over the past year and is considering just continuing with that, but is willing to get the bifocals if it is worth it.....so I guess that's the question????? How do you know it is worth It? Her rx:

R +.75 -.75×085 add +1.75

L +.75 -.50×090 add +1.75

Any opinions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!


Diane 08 Jun 2018, 16:18

Thank you to everyone that has responded. I was busy and did not get a chance to update you guys. We decided to go for the 1.67 lenses. We were really close to getting contacts, but i felt like if we got her contacts now from the beginning she may never like glasses.


DS 08 Jun 2018, 09:24

Sorry I'm late getting back to the board.

Hopefully you have already ordered glasses using an optician's advice.

If you haven't, then with that additional information about a certain update in 6 months, I would recommend contacts (only a 6-month supply) and an inexpensive pair of glasses for overnight. For this, polycarbonate might be good enough.

Then, I would splurge for nicer glasses for the next pair. I would personally recommend 1.61 lenses for "nice" glasses. 1.67 will have a performance/cosmetic trade-off worth considering. 1.74 is overkill. And your daughter is a little beyond Trivex, another lens material that would end up a bit too thick.

CR-39 will have better optics, but not noticeable especially if your daughter isn't getting her full prescription. And CR-39 will be thick. It is important that your daughter feels good about herself in her glasses, so I would deliberately err towards better cosmetics and totally rule out the CR-39.

There is no "right" answer except to make sure you get your daughter her vision correction.


Maxim 06 Jun 2018, 16:38

... and then had them fitted with 1.74 lenses from a company in the UK if she liked a particular frame .... -

Amendment: You can buy 1.74 index lenses from Zenni, the are 70,00 $ more per pair.


Maxim 06 Jun 2018, 16:36

Thank you, Chrystal Veil, for your encouraging comment.

But I feel, their still might be some misunderstanding.

I say bluntly, just to make it not too expensive, to order both, the glasses with basic lenses (at 40 $ approx.) from Zenni, and, if frame size, frame style etc. make a perfect fit, then order the same frame with the 1.74 index option - that is just 120 $ at Zenni, but 500 $ approx. in a high street optician.

Quite frankly, my wife and my daughter always buy their glasses at the high street optician, and they pay 500 Euros each - my wife for varifocals, and my daughter for power in combination with the 1.74 index.

Daddy is buying the cheap ones then. But, as I cannot measure the frame, and with all the shortcomings of an online order, it happened to me, that I did not buy the right frame.

There are very lower prices (120 instead of 500 EUR), but higher risk of unperfect fit (an estimated 1 in every 5) in online buying.


Crystal Veil 06 Jun 2018, 15:31

Diane,

a word of support. A friend of mine was born and raised in a very isolated farming area. She went to a primary school with only twenty pupils (age 6 to 12), two classrooms. Her myopia was only discovered at the age of nine and her first glasses were minus five. Her mother felt guilty about not having guessed earlier on that something was wrong with her daughter's eyesight. The daughter is now in her mid sixties and her prescription seems to have more or less stabilized at minus twelve. She had returned to glasses after dry eyes forced her to stop contact lenses in her late forties. I met her a few years later and she complained about the astronomic cost of her prescription glasses. To cut a long story short, I did exactly what Maxim suggests, ordering cheap glasses from Zenni and then had them fitted with 1.74 lenses from a company in the UK if she liked a particular frame. My suggestion to you for your daughter is: 1) don't hesitate to spend money on her first pair and 2) order from Zenni afterwards. Just my two cents.


Maxim 06 Jun 2018, 11:49

Do you live in the US?

Have a look at these:

https://www.zennioptical.com/orderGlasses?productId=1288&skuId=128818

Girls' Rectangle Eyeglasses 128818

With the standard index (thicker lenses - as a trial buy) you would get those at 40,00 $ approx plus postage - a total of 50,00 $.

When they fit perfect, and when your daughter likes them, you could buy a second pair with "index 1.74" (superthin), the same frame, but the better lenses would be 70-80 $ more, hence 110,00 or 120,00 $.

Have a try!


Maxim 06 Jun 2018, 11:26

To Diane (typo correction):

"I still use those glasses, but my home, it's ridiculous!" should read:

"I still use those glasses, but .... I never leave my home with them, they're just ridiculous!"

....

It is not too difficult to order online glasses, but on the other hand, it is prone to errors, or misselections, like every online buying (or mail order buying in the old days).


Maxim 06 Jun 2018, 11:20

To Diane:

I didn't mean to be the 'poster from the cold' (anonymous), I just wrote, and then I forgot to put my name in.

The advantage of thinner glasses is the weight as well. The lenses should not be too big in diameter. This means lower thickness at the edges as well, but less weight. I feel with the power needed, the weight issue is important as well.

Those high index lenses (that's the name for thinner lenses) are really sometimes very expensive. My youngest daughter (born in 1998) has a prescription of -7.00 / - 9.00 approx. both with astigmatism as well, but these high index lenses look much nicer indeed. We had to pay something around 500,00 Euros (roughly 550 US-$) for her last pair, and we really had to take a deep breath for paying this.

What you could do (I do it for my glasses sometimes):

I buy at Zenni's - also high index lenses are less than 100,00 $. I first buy a frame with cheap lenses, and when everything seems perfect, I buy the same frame with high index lenses.

I proceed like this, as I had a tricky experience with online buying: I bought a frame, and when it arrived, it was by far too big, and it was very ugly looking. I still use those glasses, but my home, it's ridiculous! Those are computer distance/reading distance bifocals (+1.25 / +2.75 over my distance correction).

As I always need bifocals or varifocals (up to 100,00 Euros/$), I first buy a frame with the basic lenses (frames inclusive lenses up to 30,00), and then I buy the same frame with the high index, complicated, antireflex beautiful lenses (and now I always have a spare frame, should there happen an accident with the frame).

But: there is no time to loose, and your little girl needs her correction as soon as possible! I am sure, she will be very happy, when she will have all the possibilities of a good vision. All my best wishes to you and your daughter!

www.zennioptical.com -


Soundmanpt 05 Jun 2018, 23:49

Diane

You can always ask them to show you several lens blanks in the thinner lens option as well as the regular CR -39 lens. That should give you a pretty food idea what the difference is. A lens blank is the way lens comes in before being cut down to fit into a frame.


Fuhrer 05 Jun 2018, 16:00

In case you haven't figured it out, something going to that prescription at that age is a complete bullshit story.


Weirdeyes 05 Jun 2018, 15:54

Diane

They’d be pretty thick. Lenses generally start to get thick at around -3.00 and -7.00 is definitely thick. Another big issue is that her left lens will be thicker than the right lens. One thing you can do to get thinner lenses is pick glasses that are smaller, rounder, well centered and thick rimmed. What I mean by well centered is that her pupil is in the center of the lens. That will reduce distortion and make the lenses thinner.


Diane 05 Jun 2018, 13:30

To the anonymous poster, thank you for your input. I do agree 100%, I want my daughter to feel comfortable and confident in her glasses, and if I have to spend a little more than that is fine. I just want to know to what extent. What lenses should I buy her, more like at what point will the cost not be worth it? Also, I still do not really understand the need to buy thinner lennses, why are thick lenses bad? How thick would they even be, maybe if it is like a block of glass infront of her eyes I would understand wanting thinner lenses.


 05 Jun 2018, 12:31

Andrew, I can't accept your remarks.

Money ia one thing, but for a sixteen year old girl it is very important to look as nice as possible. These are not just fakelenses, or -1.00 lenses.

Can you feel, what this girl might feel, when she looks in the mirror? The lenses should be the nicest lenses possible with this prescription!

If she has a nice frame, and good quality lenses, she might accept these glasses and be happy with them. It is for sure, with this -4.75/-7.00 prescription, she can never go without glasses!


 05 Jun 2018, 12:31

Andrew, I can't accept your remarks.

Money ia one thing, but for a sixteen year old girl it is very important to look as nice as possible. These are not just fakelenses, or -1.00 lenses.

Can you feel, what this girl might feel, when she looks in the mirror? The lenses should be the nicest lenses possible with this prescription!

If she has a nice frame, and good quality lenses, she might accept these glasses and be happy with them. It is for sure, with this -4.75/-7.00 prescription, she can never go without glasses!


Dianne 04 Jun 2018, 13:30

Also, Soundmanpt as much as I hate to mention it, I would be those teachers you are referring to. My daughter has been homeschooled since the 2nd grade. Maybe at a real school her eyesight would have been caught earlier.


This page shows the 50 most recent posts. You may also View All Posts to the thread.